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the charges, miranda rights, the public safety exemption, where are we right now on that issue? >> well, the normal rule is that when someone's irsed, they're advised of their rights. you have the right to remain silent. anything you say can be used against you. you have the right to a lawyer. if you can't afford one it will be provided, that sort of thing. if police don't give that warning then they cannot use any statements of the defendant in court. the exception to that is called the public safety exception. it's been extended by judges to terrorism cases. and the idea is that if you need information quickly to preserve public safety, you can ask those questions and still use the responses in court. but that public safety exception rule is limited. it only applies for several hours after fill in the blank. we assume after questioning starts rather than after arrest. probably no more than a day, day and a half. >> where do you come up with that? pete, let me interrupt you there. who has come up with what is the time? is it just, you know it when you see it? >> in terms of the time li
to the miranda rule. they've not advised him of his rights. so they can only ask about potential threats to public safety. were there other conspirators, other bombs out there, any reason to believe that public safety is in any way jeopardized. >> pete, one of the persons cited in terms of this idea that there may have been more violent plans on order at the hands of the brothers is this person who was hijacked by the brothers on thursday night. and the driver of a mercedes suv. we know that he's been cooperating with police. is there anything else that we know about his involvement in all of this? >> yeah, the business about new york is very iffy, frankly. i've emailed briefly with this person. he claims that he escaped with they stopped at a gasoline station. but he's also told the police that he was told by these two men, that they were the marathon bombers. but that they were not going to kill him because he was not an american. what he told the police was, that he thought they were speaking arabic. that's probably not the case, they were probably speaking russian or some dialect. an
understand if he is indeed conscious and does survive before reading him miranda rights; is that correct? >> i believe molly line will be talking about that a little bit as well. there is a loophole. there is a way they don't have to. so he was not read his miranda rights to allow to ask questions of him. we don't know if questions have been asked. they may have asked questions of him when he was under the situation he was in, of course being pretty seriously injured. they do believe he is going to make it. that was something, not only important for them to do that because that is what we do in this society but important because of this investigation. last night we were told he was being brought here for treatment. we weren't too far behind the ambulance. as you made your way through boston, you could see many of the businesses reopened. you saw restaurants and bars reopened. at one point there was a small college and 500 students had gone into the streets and blocked off all four lanes cheering, holding signs and as first responders and medical teams came through that had nothing to do
. >> let's talk about the issue a lot of people have been talking about. not everybody, but some. miranda rights. we've watched enough detective shows no know, police shows, they give miranda rights almost like blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. it's done. why do you think that's an issue? now we just got the word as we went on the air tonight the defendant here, the suspect, i guess he's a defendant now, has been given his miranda rights. >> this is truly something of an urban legend. people like to watch shows where a criminal goes free because he wasn't given miranda rights. that's extremely rare. i do criminal defense work. i can tell you, the most you can hope for in a miranda case is one or two statements will not make it into court. it's rare the whole case falls out unless everything -- >> so it's not the poison fruit thing? >> there is a poison fruit provision, standard. but it's very rare for it to pollute an entire case. >> let me ask you practically, why don't the law enforcement officials, the federal officials up there who have him in custody at the hospital, why didn't they just
whether he should be read his miranda rights. >> you're giving them the option, as to whether or not they want to cooperate and i don't believe they should have that option. this is sole will i for the purpose of interrogation to find intelligence to get the intelligence that i believe we need. >> questions remain -- did the brothers have help in carrying out their attacks? >> we're satisfied that the two actors here, the two people that were committing the damage have either been arrested or killed. and the people of the city of boston can rest comfortably at this point in time. >>> but did the fbi miss warning signs after interviewing 26-year-old tamerlan tsarnaev in 2011? where did the brothers get their guns? their training? and their inspiration? >>> in washington, the boston terror attack could become an excuse to slow down immigration reform. >> if ways to improve the bill offered amendment when we start mark-up in may and let's vote on it. i say that particularly those pointing to what happened, the terrible tragedy in boston as a -- i would say excuse for not doing th
but in the beginning he will not be given the usual miranda warning about the right to remain silent. instead, the government will invoke a rule that allows questioning a suspect without giving advice of rights. >> there is a public safety exemption in cases of national security and potential charges involving acts of terrorism and so the government has that opportunity right now. >> reporter: the government invoked the same rule in the case of the so-called underwear bomber. as in his case it allows questioning to learn of any potential plots or accomplices that could present a continuing threat. >> the first questions the fbi will focus on are specific threats that he might be aware of likely are there any other improvised explosive devices, other people working in the network. the sorts of things that go directly to whether or not there's a continuing threat to public safety. >> reporter: he'll face charges brought by the justice department because terrorism is a federal crime with a trial in a regular civilian court. and as in other high profile terrorism cases, some republicans in congre
analyst. the 19-year-old has not been read his miranda rights. why does this matter what has it allowed for? what is the issue here? >> a lot of variables here, the question is he in any kwan condition to answer questions with or without miranda? what is his health situation? also, even if he doesn't get miranda warnings, he may decline to answer questions in any case. they can't force him to answer questions, but if he does not receive miranda warnings and if he then anticipates questions those answers cannot be used in a criminal case against him. they can be used for intelligence gathering. they can be used if there are other conspirators who may be prosecuted, can't be used against him. other evidence can be used against him. may be lots of other evidence. if you don't get miranda warnings, your statements i can't be used against you. >> so this is a sensitive issue. another sensitive issue raised by republican senators, lindsey graham, kelly ayotte, peter king, they released a statement, the suspect, based upon his actions, clearly is a good candidate for enemy combat tant status.
's been read his miranda rights and at what point does he get counsel? >> he will get counsel more or less immediately, if he asks for it. certainly he will be read his miranda rights. this is obviously a very controversial subject involving terrorism investigations, but since this was an fbi arrest, this will -- he will be read his miranda rights. he doesn't have to ask for a lawyer. he could make statements that could later be used against him. that's after all what the miranda warnings are. you can have an attorney or you can make a statement. depending on -- >> jeff, let me jump in here. i want to check in with john king. >> -- he will either speak to -- >> john, you're hearing more? >> i just want to pass along information from our producer, who says two federal law enforcement officials have confirmed to her they have verified the identity. it is the younger brother, suspect number two, in custody. it is now they say federal officials verified the identity and have no doubt. as i said earlier, a federal official i communicated with said in custody, unspecified medical needs and they
, they suspended his miranda rights for a 48 hour period and decide whether or not to seek the death penalty -- listen to this from last night as well. >> this is still an active and ongoing investigation. we're going to be reviewing all of the evidence. before that kind of a decision is made in terms of whether or not to seek the death penalty, you review all of the evidence and it's a very thoughtful, long process that is engaged and it's the attorney general of the department of justice that makes that final decision. >> martha: all right. so there you have that. let's bring in fox news legal analyst peter johnson, jr. peter, welcome. >> how are you? >> martha: that's the u.s. attorney on this case in boston. she says it's too early to talk about death penalty. >> i was really surprised and disturbed as an american and as a lawyer in watching that last night. you couldn't think of a more weak insip mid remark that she was making. the charges that will be filed in this case, i haven't seen them, but i can approximate what they are -- are death penalty charges under federal law, including u
be charged as early as today. investigators did not read him his miranda rights when he was captured. they invoked what they call the public safety exception. it permits law enforcement officials to interrogate a suspect and use that information as direct evident in court, and that is causing some controversy out there. let's talk about that. we'll talk about that in a few moments. also want to talk about other issues. joining us, former u.s. attorney doug jones who led the prosecutor against eric ruduffel, the 1996 atlanta olympic bomber. thank you for joining us. first of all, let's talk about this video. this video that has now surfaced that cnn has confirmed, a well known jihadist in dagestan who himself was killed in december, the video was posted on tamerlan tsarnaev's youtube channel. since then, it's been deleted. what does that say, if you're a u.s. attorney investigating this case, what does that say to you? >> well, wolf, i think it would be one of two things. there obviously could be some contact since he traveled over that way. there could have been some contact. there c
, survived. he's an american citizen. natural i naturalized 9/11 of last year. should he be given miranda rights? should he be treated as an enemy combatant? that debate has started. give me the facts, first, what they'll do. >> this administration has made a policy decision here. first, that's number one. secondly, he cannot be tried as an enemy combatant in a military tribunal because that law was changed by the national defense authorization act of 2012 that says you can't do that to an american citizen. what some advocates, republicans, are saying such as lindsey graham are -- we understand, they say, we understand he's going to be tried in civilian court but start the questioning -- treat him as an enemy combatant under the law of war. question him by intelligence people. get all the intel you can. then turn him over to the civ civilian authorities. that's what they advocate. that's not going to happen, the administration has decided. he'll be questioned first by this special group set up in the last couple of years in terror cases called the high value detainee interrogation group,
of public safety exception before you give him his miranda rights, all that talk of naming him as an enemy combatant, all of that is moot right now. they've gone forward with the official proceedings. >> well, they may have used the public safety exception, and apparently they were using it to question him, and he responded in some way given his medical condition. but certainly now that he has a lawyer, that period, however long it was, is over. and you're right, the enemy combatant thing was a nonstarter from the never going to happen. this is a criminal case in federal court in massachusetts, and that's where it will stay until it's resolved one way or another. >> it's going to take a while. thanks very much, jeffrey. much more on what's going on in this boston investigation coming up here in "the situation room" 0. >>> also, another terror plot released today, new information. canadian authorities announcing the arrest of two men believed to be part of a terror plot to attack a passenger train that may have been heading towards the united states, the plot said to have an alleged connect
okayed the suspension of the suspect's miranda rights. is that a temporary suspension? >> reporter: yes, by law it is. it's called the public safety exception to the miranda rule. normally you have to tell someone they have a right to remain silent and if you don't, then you can't use anything they tell you in court. so that's why the miranda warning is given. but there is an exception. you don't have to do it if there's a possible threat to public safety. and here obviously there's a concern about whether there are potential accomplices. investigators say they haven't found any. or other explosives. they say they haven't found any of those either but that's what they want to ask him. and this exception probably begins to expire the moment you invoke it so it's probably no good for more than a day or two but nonetheless they can do that. afterwards they'll have to give him his miranda warning and say whether he'll continue to answer questions. the justice department says even in very serious cases like this, most people in custody do continue to talk. >> pete, who's going to be interrog
's before he gets the miranda rights. the fact that he can't speak right now, does that push back that window of time because they're not getting anything from him? >> that's a good question that i won't speculate on without a legal background. i'll leave that one up to the master pete williams. but i can imagine there's got to be some sort of gray area there that some lawyer could look at. on that point, though, i think it's interesting, where we've gone now from, alex, is we've gone from this, all right, what exactly happened, to these real sort of questions surrounding the national security of this country, and how exactly these two individuals were able to go forward with what they ultimately accomplished. so this morning, sort of around that point, talking to folks related to the house homeland security committee, they say they really want to sort of get this investigation rolling on why these two individuals seem to have slipped through the u.s. intelligence community, especially after that information reported yesterday that the russians were concerned about the older broth
miranda rights. >> >> not not at all. he'll be entitled to his american rights and i think if we don't do that, we become less of ourselves. we are americans. we have beauties in this system. we some problems in the system. i think if we do anything other than embrace what america is all about, then the terrorist would have won and i think that is the absolute wrong thing to do. >> congressman, thanks so much. good to see you. appreciate it. >>> we know now that 19-year-old dzhokhar tsarnaev will face federal terrorism charges and with all the photographs and video, is the case a slam dunk for prosecutors? we'll look into that next. i have low testosterone. there, i said it. how did i know? well, i didn't really. see, i figured low testosterone would decrease my sex drive... but when i started losing energy and became moody... that's when i had an honest conversation with my doctor. we discussed all the symptoms... then he gave me some blood tests. showed it was low t. that's it. it was a number -- not just me. [ male announcer ] today, men with low t have androgel 1.62% (testosterone gel
miranda rights? >> yes, that's my view. >> so that changes nothing in view of their ability to interrogate? >> what it changes is their ability to question him and use any statement that he makes. that they're not allowed to do. >> he is apparently claiming -- >> they don't need that in this case. they got a mountain of evidence against this guy. >> right. they have testified it seems against him and his brother for the act they perpetrated. >> correct. >> what they will i'm sure be extremely curious to find out if they can is are they part of a wider group of either like-minded individuals who have been coordinating themselves reading stuff on the internet, videos and so on, which apparently is what he's claiming. whether they're attached to anybody in chechnya, for example, or islamic fundamentalist nature, et cetera, et cetera, how far can you go in terms of eliciting that information from somebody like him in his position once he's had his miranda rights read to him as he now has? >> my view is you can go as far as you think it's productive to go. however, i don't think it's terribly p
with the questions out receiving miranda warnings but the only downside is that his statements may not be used against him at trial. this is not much of a risk when you consider the other available evidence including photo images of him at the scene of the bombings and his own reported confession to the victim whose car he helped hijack during the last week's terror in boston. . but if your concern is over the larger threat in who the tsarnaev brothers were and are, what they did and what they represent, then worry a lot. for starters, you you can worry about how the high-value intergage group or h.i.g., will do its work. that unit was finally put in place by the f.b.i. after so-called underwear bomber tried to blow up the airplane in which he was traveling as it flew over detroit on christmas day, 2009. and was advise of his mir and da rights. the c.i.a. interrogation program that might have handleled the interview had by then been dismantled by president obama. at the behest of such muslim brotherhood affiliated groups as the council on american islamic relations, and the islamic society of
news tsarnaev will not be given a miranda warning when he's physically able to be interrogated after receiving medical treatment. instead, the official says the government will invoke a legal rule known as the public safety exception. that will allow investigators to question tsarnaev without first advising him of his right to remain silent and be afforded legal counsel. president obama used his weekly address today to praise law enforcement and those involved in tracking tsarnaev down. >> americans refused to be terrorized. ultimately, that's what we'll remember from this week. that's what will remain, the stories of heroism and kindness, resolve and resilience, generosity, and love. >> authorities caught up with the suspect after a tip from a watertown resident. he was hiding in a boat parked outside a home. he is now in a boston hospital and nbc's ron allen is joining me from there. ron, with a good afternoon to you, let's get the very latest on his condition. are you getting word from the hospital or are they staying somewhat silent on that? >> reporter: absolutely silent, alex.
was provided before or after that judge/magistrate was there and r read him his miranda rights? the right to remain silent and the right to have an attorney? >> sources have indicated to us that was part of a questioning that they did under the -- fbi agent does under a national security exemption, before he was assigned counsel. they had the ability in the interest of public safety exception to be able to ask questions, were there additional coconspirators, where and were there additional explosives. the source of things you want to know immediately in order to protect the public. presumably base wanted on what we are hearing, those are the questions they asked and the kinds of responses prior to the first appearance yesterday. >> that would fit in with the public safety exception in the there a in providing the miranda rights to this criminal defendant as he now is, charges have been read to him. fran, we'll stay in close touch with you, fran townsend. much more from boston in just a moment. other news that we're watching as well. the fbi, back in washington, up on capitol hill, lawmake
a former federal prosecutor. we now that dzhokhar, suspect number two, has been read his miranda rights. sow won't be designated as an enemy combatant. but if he was labelled an enemy combatant, he wouldn't have been entitled to a lawyer and a jury trial. they could have asked him a lot of other questions without a lawyer present that may or may not be relevant to national security. now why did they make this decision not to go for enemy combatant status? do they think they have so much evidence in this case that they can go ahead with the civilian jury trial and they don't need to hide behind enemy combatant? >> i think that is certainly part of it. it does look like an overwhelming body of evidence. more than that, they thought they could get the immediate information they needed by the miranda exception, the public safety exception so they could make sure the public was safe. there accident seem to be an constitution aal basis to treat someone that commits a crime like this on our soil. the supreme court has upheld treating an american, the american taliban hamdi captured in afghanis
wouldn't apply. you're seeing that play out in terms that he wasn't read his miranda rights. the difference being they can ask the question, they can get the information they need. but, the information they get, they can't, then, turn around and use against him at a trial. that would have to be gained separately. >> okay, thank you, chris. chris pulling a late shift for us. it was interesting, he said that, well, dzhokhar will, in fact, be a valuable piece of evidence, if you like. really, he was an older bloer. the younger one, i don't know, went aloong for the ride. >> yeah, the older brother, younger brother scenario. how this is sort of reminiscent of the sniper shooting. it was a similar situation. it soernly was a question just floating out there right now. and now that the police work has played off and chris was talking about tonight, as you've been discussing, it's really time to the legal aspect of the marathon bombings. earlier tonight, anderson cooper talked with senior legal analyst, jeffrey toobin. the first thing that will happen will lay out the basics of the
the question this is exactly the whole issue going back to the miranda, if he had the public safety concern of what were those explosive devices intended for? that's one of the reasons they wanted to talk to him or one of the things thaw wanted to talk to him about at the time before they realized how severely hurt he was. it absolutely proves the point there could have more more attacks planned or another person who was a part of it who maybe at the last minute didn't do it. another reason to think there was more planned is maybe that's why they didn't kill themselves at the time of the marathon attack. they wanted to live to attack another day. >> jeff, somebody must have trained them. can you learn to build a bomb by yourself just by going to the internet and going out there, go to a home depot and buying this kind of stuff? >> you could try to learn, but what you would certainly want to do is rehearse. you don't want to go through the operational energy that it would take to mount an attack like at the marathon without having a fair degree of confidence that your device is going to work
about miranda rights and whether a terrorist or accused terrorist is supposed to have their miranda rights read to them. do you know if they actually read them the miranda rights? >> i don't know yet. presumably that may happen before there are charges. but there is a public safety exception where they can delay reading him his rights. as you know, there are all these calls to try him as an enemy combatant as opposed to within the criminal justice system, which seems to be what the obama administration will do. after all, he is a u.s. citizen. he carried out the crime on u.s. soil. and there doesn't seem to be a whole lot of legal basis to try him as enemy combatant, which is not to say there aren't going to be more calls particularly from the right to do just that. >> when in theory you have so much evidence on american soil, why tarnish the prosecution by going enemy combatant. if you have no backlash from anybody who says you didn't do it the right way. >> he stole a suspect. but clearly -- you've got to walk through the process, right? >> i was thinking this weekend, again, and
terrorism suspects without reading them miranda rights. the rule was created to question terrorists about other potential threats. senator carl leven says so far there's no connection between the suspect and terrorist groups. leven said to hold him under these circumstances would be contrary to our laws and jeopardize our effort to prosecute him. during interviews before suspects are read their rights is often not admissible during the trial. the issue on miranda rights is further complicated because the u.s. is a u.s. citizen. many of the rules cannot be used on americans. live in the newsroom, katie utehs. ktvu news. >>> people are in texas are being allowed in their homes. curfew is still in effect and there is limited water and electricity. many are still trying to learn the condition of family and friends hurt in the explosion. >> it's really hectic, but we are patient because we know the extent of damage on the other side. and we got friends and family that we don't know about over there. >> 14 people died in the fertilizer plant explosion, including 11 emergency responders. 200 m
they not have read his miranda rights to him yesterday if that is the case? do you leave the door of legal opportunity open a while longer. >> there are two separate issues. the public safety exception applies regardless of the type of offense that the government is investigating, and using the public safety exception is recognized by the united states supreme court. it's a lawful way of trying to get information in a very short window of time tinge le particularly when you're concerned about public safety issues as the investigators certainly were as a result of the horrific acts that the bombing suspects, the bombing defendants who are h are accused of. bill: this is a guy to lived here more than ten years. came here 2002 if memory serves. your case with richard reid he was far from an american citizen, he was far from even making a home here. what have we done in 12 years? make sure that the prosecutions can be successful? >> i would suggest that we should be using all the tools that both the united states supreme court has indicated are available in order to keep america safe, and all
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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